My clay pieces have been called ‘futuristic,’ in part because of their unconventional form, especially in relation to traditional Pueblo pottery. But, like my ancestors, I am inspired by what I see and find in nature. More specifically, I am drawn to polygonal shapes and spheres that make up the basic structure of minerals and gems.

JEFF SUINA

JEFF SUINA

Meet The Artist

Jeff Suina is a Native American multi-media artist who creates compelling forms out of clay; blending traditional and contemporary materials and methods. Although he creates art in the traditional Cochiti method, his inspiration is drawn from a wide variety of subjects: everything from astronomy and science fiction to architecture and parametric design.Jeff grew up in Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico and comes from a long line of potters and painters. Like other Pueblo artists, Suina learned the fundamentals of his craft during his adolescence while working alongside his mother, who is also a potter.



Jeff received his B.A. in architecture from the University of New Mexico in 1997 and worked as Creative Director at Bohannon Huston, a nationally recognized firm specializing in engineering, spatial data, and advanced technologies. He recently retired to pursue his art on a full-time basis. A self-described “techno-nerd”, Jeff has extensive experience with 3D modeling, animation, and visualization. Jeff recently completed an artist residency with the Hand and Machine Lab at the University of New Mexico. The Experimental Clay Residency Program pairs artists and researchers together, developing techniques in 3D printed ceramics while exploring relationships between technology, materials, and culture.


Jeff has shown his work at various shows and galleries. His main goals as an artist are to share his ideas with the world and to add a sense of beauty, awareness, and balance to the world. “My clay pieces have been called ‘futuristic,’ in part because of their unconventional form, especially in relation to traditional Pueblo pottery. But, like my ancestors, I am inspired by what I see and find in nature. More specifically, I am drawn to polygonal shapes and spheres that make up the basic structure of minerals and gems.”



Jeff sometimes works with commercial clay but prefers natural clay, which he collects and processes himself. He also sources his pigments locally and derives his black pigment from wild spinach (also known as Rocky Mountain beeplant).Jeff was awarded first place for his piece ‘Lion’ at the 2023 Santa Fe Indian Market. He lives in Cochiti with his wife and three sons, where he is a member of the tribal council.

Selected publications
MUSEUM COLLECTIONS